What would you do? – Follow up


This video is to follow up on my recent vlog, “What would you do?”

35 comments

  • Nojeta 12 years ago

    No Deaf is alone in encountering this kind of situation like yours. Some people are illiterate for whatever reason like ESL or learning disabilities and in the past, I did write “He can’t read this, kindly please read it to him for me” to the person next to me. I am sensitive to such people who try their utmost best to serve us and I expect others feel the same about us, the Deaf people who prefers to communicate using paper/pen.

    Reply
  • SDA 12 years ago

    Joey,
    Good for you!
    You took control of the situation last week when ordering food and encountering the same problem. Letting others behind you know the nature of the problem was just simple and perfect! Responses you got from others were evidently positive.
    🙂

    Reply
  • Gary Brooks 12 years ago

    Funny when you mention that one comment said “walk out” I was laughing because I know several friends of mine said “not provide our need, fine! we walk out!” I said to them “let stay and work together, be patience because at the end we can successeful both ways” “walk out” won’t solve the problems.

    Reply
  • Katherine 12 years ago

    Good job! The part about the person behind, who responded to you affirmatively at that time and afterward, will change hearing people’s way of thinking about the deaf population.

    The more we use this approach, they’ll learn to overcome their own ignorance and realize one doesn’t have to hear/speak in order to be literate. They get to see that the workers can’t read or write while deaf customers like us can. With their experience to helped them to erase their previous misconceoption, they can help spread word to other hearing people.

    In short, I think people like you have made a difference!

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  • Michele 12 years ago

    I must share something with you all! Yesterday I went to Rita’s Italian Ice (it just opened yesterday for the first time) to treat my family for an Italian Ice. Upon placing my order, know what the person did? She immediately took out a laminated paper with the list of menu and gave me a pen to check off what I wanted to order. I was very pleasantly surprised with this kind of attitude. After I ordered, I asked her who was the new owner. I found out that this woman who gave me the paper was actually the new owner! I gave her a big thumbs up and told her that she did a great job of making her restaurant accessible to us.

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  • Tamara 12 years ago

    IMPRESSED!!!!!!! I was with one of my friends, We ordered fast food at Arby’s. She got wrong food and she threw food over the counter to cashier. Yikes!!!
    Good Job Joey!!!

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  • Ella Lentz 12 years ago

    great review. Loved how you played with transitions to “list” various suggestions. Fascinating to pick up a very common and minor experience and analyze it and have everybody start thinking more about it and be aware and starting figuring for ourselves what is best…and even experiement with different approaches. Good job!!!

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  • Kathy Weldon 12 years ago

    I love your vlogs! Keep it up! I like to share an experience I had long time ago when I worked as a hostess in Denny’s reataurant. It is easy for me to lead people to table and give water or coffee. I can handle cash at cashier. However, when there is a long waiting line, I have to get names and how many people in a party. One time I was honest and said I could not hear, I got a rude comment like “people like you should not work here!” I decided to try a different tactic…I used “hearing excuse” : I cannot spell, can you write it down for me? Instead of rude comments, I get “SURE!”. What a difference!

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  • G 12 years ago

    Lots of these suggestons are good. FYI, in the hearing world…our society…most people will just walk out but that is not all! Most will write a letter or speak to the owner or manager of that business and tell them that they just lost a customer due to their inept of either their service or their hiring of an employee that failed to do their job well in serving the customer.

    All in all…we tend to do what we feel is a comfortable level for us. So whatever makes you feel better, do it. IF it makes you feel better to be disorderly, that’s not the way to go. Keep your cool at all times.

    Some people like Joey needs reassurance from the public that what he is doing and why it is happening, that he is in the right. While others don’t give a hoot what other people think of them.

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  • MikeS 12 years ago

    Your 2nd point story made me laugh and that hearing person in line recognized you have read/write skills and acknowledged you that you are OK and capable person. I can understand how you want to be seen like that, not other way around. I went to Taco Bell yesterday with
    pre-written order. The lady read my order and gave me what I wanted, but added something extra that I did not write down in my order. I’m short 99 cents. 😉

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  • Wacky Taz 12 years ago

    Good vlog, Joey. There are many different approaches on how to deal with this particular situations. Some are workable for some people and not for others.

    Some deaf people choose one approach and others choose a different approach. Choose what works best for you and other party at the same time show hearing people what deaf people can do in order to destroy the misconceptions or myths they have in mind.

    I’m interested in what other situations that deaf people runs in and what they do to resolve the situation. Have you heard or experienced any other situation that you might want to bring to your future vlogs, Joey? 🙂

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  • Roger Kraft 12 years ago

    This reminds me of one time when I actually took the cashier’s machine, turned it around, and pushed the buttons related to the order myself. Blame my Maryland SD schoolmate, Randy, for teaching me that!

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  • Penny 12 years ago

    I watched your previous Vlog taken in Colorado. I don’t know why but I thought your question was after the manager solved problem with deli person and then you wanted to know what you should do with people who were behind you…if you should let the manager to tell people what was happening or for you to tell them yourself. Now in this Vlog, you asked what you should do when deli person did not understand your order and how you should deal with people who were behind you. I think you were cordial by telling person behind you what was going on. Some Deaf people would have insulted the deli person that he can’t read but you did the opposite. I think there are different ways how to handle this situation. Good discussion.

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  • Jean Boutcher 12 years ago

    Joey, Two minds with the same question. I will get back to you after a sociologist answers my question as to why some hearing people do not look down at other hearing people who cannot read or write. I love your inquisitive mind!

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  • Working Brain 12 years ago

    Joey, I am puzzled by this bizarre need of yours to win approval from total strangers waiting in line behind you, and make it clear to them that it’s not YOU who has the problem. Did it not occur to you that this person’s smiling, waves, thumbs-up gestures, etc., were just patronizing, and he still thinks of you as a limited person anyway? There was no real interchange between the two of you. You don’t know what thoughts he was having, or whether you made either a positive or a negative impression on him. Why not ask for the manager of the restaurant instead? You could communicate to the manager instead about better ways to make the menu accessible. Like #5 above, putting the items on a plastic card. Seems to me you’re way more concerned about your own ego than you are about resolving the communication barrier in a way that doesn’t make someone else look bad, like the worker who cannot read.

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  • Nathan 12 years ago

    Another situation that is common in fast food resturants or coffee shops that require a line is after the cashier gives you a pen and paper, the cashier will ask the person behind you what they want to order while you are writing or the person behind you will start ordering. Either way, it happens often and I feel that is extremely rude, it is the equivalent to cutting in a line full of strangers. I have at times felt like I wish I had a flash card in my back pocket that I could whip out and put in their face that says “excuse me, you are being rude” or something similar to that. What would be the best way to handle this kind of situation, which I know happens to the majority of us.

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  • kira 12 years ago

    love ur vlog as always! smile.. i suggest u never walk out cuz otherwise u may never get extra free meal. me and my hubby always get extra meals. cool!

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  • Phil 12 years ago

    Heh. I got to tell you the experience I had in Jerusalem Israel. EASY!

    Also, doctor’s office receptionist is unbelievable dumber! Here is the video which I am trying to tell you.

    http://my.videoegg.com/video/dKpITZ

    NCAA Madness is HERE now!! 🙂

    T’care.

    Judge

    Reply
  • barberclown 12 years ago

    In my shoes, I share same frustration with illiterate cashiers at fast food places so I devised a plan- Blackberry! I used the Memo pad where I keep a list of food places I go to, Starbucks, Arbys, Mcdonalds… you get the idea and open a starbuck link and you will see my desired order. click mcdonalds, you see a prepared order! Also, you can always edit and write the different food you’re in mood for! VERY HANDY!

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  • Tara (MO) 12 years ago

    What you did what I would do too. Interesting on other views on what they would do…hmmm, something to think about yet I prefer do the right way and of course in a nice way with a good feeling. 🙂

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  • Kristina 12 years ago

    thank for the good suggestions.. i will give a try without being cranky!!! yea we need to show them that we can write and read!! show the message to someone behind you so that way they know what’s happening and we can walk out of the place with a happy face!!

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  • Don Grushkin 12 years ago

    Regarding this situation, I understand the feeling of embarrassment seeing Hearing look at you because the guy couldn’t get your order right. But, I don’t think for the most part, the Hearing were looking at you because they were thinking “Deaf people can’t write”. They were probably looking at you because you were holding up the line, period, and they are all in a busy airport, needing to catch their planes in 20 min, etc, and you were trying to get your order right. When was the last time you were in a supermarket in the Express lane and the little old lady in front of you decides to pay by check and writes out (very slowly) the check AFTER the whole thing has been totaled up? Or (as happened to me a couple of weeks ago) the family in the Express lane with exactly 20 items paying with WIC vouchers (the cashier has to manually verify each item is allowable, process each voucher, etc. etc etc) —-GRRRRRR! I bet you’re not thinking nice thoughts about those people at that time!

    Of course you have the right to get your order right, and I have done the same thing. But, don’t feel guilty about making Deaf look bad. You’re just guilty of asserting your consumer rights.

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  • Orkid : ) 12 years ago

    Often I was in your shoes before. Myself could talk okay but I rather not because I hate to speak in public places. Instead – I wrote down things I ask like where can I find this or that or order foods. Often I get respond from any workers, such as old men to young women, who were unable to read my written notes. Choices: I asked for other worker who is can be able to read my notes or forget it too much work to do explain it. Also big challenge living/working in SF city – so many Asian and Hispanic workers are not able to read English either. I often end up having wrong orders and swallow with it. : ( Unless – I have Chinese and Spanish – English dictionaries with me to show.
    What do you think folks? Gestures something not working either because of some cultural conflicted and misunderstanding.

    Reply
  • ron davenport 12 years ago

    Hi Joey,
    probably surpised to hear from me. smiles. Yes I had encountered numberous of times but worst thing was I used to work for 300 7-11 stores doing conscuricton works. a clerlk do now know what what i erote, so hencence a customer hand to translate for me, I ususally gesture to people well., but I need to turn off that one electric panel off so i ca n replcae mini hot wather heater / it also connects to lotto machine. I replaced it carefully as if it is still is hot. The job is done, walked back, He turned it on as he need lotto machine not the heater. no wonder my hairr is curly, lol. I deal with some people who is incapable to communicate in general ways and i laughs ad sweat, work hard to get them to get it what ai mean. Uusally I make it 99 %. Again make sure electricity panel circuit iid off, lol. Hey Hi Joey, hope We cross path again soon. take care, Ron

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  • Vans 12 years ago

    hey joey, next time when it happens again, erect the tent in dat store and protest !!! 🙂

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  • Mike Houston 12 years ago

    Good afternoon Joey,
    first of all i really enjoy your signing! very smooth and clear. i also enjoy your insight into what a deaf person goes thru on a daily basis; trying to go about their business more effectively. my solution (suggestion) to your situation is for the airport to take advantage of technology that is available which makes it easier (quicker) and cost effective for businesses (such as the fast food place) to offer you ASL access to place an order. Check out what San Antonio Airport is doing (http://www.deaflink.com/demo/airport.wmv). they are now offering ASL based communication access for deaf travelers. SAT using VRI services is just a start; now more places within the airport confines now have awareness of ASL and the ability to access terps to allow them to tap into us as a consumer market that requires some of us to use ASL to effectively communicate. I believe we will most likely not solve the interpreter shortage anytime soon; VRI access, along with VRS services gives businesses an opportunity to offer ASL as the standard form of language (same as Bi-lingual access for Spanish) which would revolutionize how the deaf go about their daily business. I welcome any comments or questions you (or anyone may have) about my suggestions. If you want more examples of where ASL is now offered please contact me anytime! Thanks again for sharing your story! Have a great day today, God bless.

    Mike Houston

    Reply
  • matt 12 years ago

    mr houston
    if you are talking about use of polycam with vri, i see many limitations with that,
    recently i did not have a successful experience with vri.
    (also polycam is cost prohibitive in some places.)
    not care to go into details but from that, i predict more success with vrs.
    one option is to come up with a rollout computer cart with wi fi and a webcam…that will work anywhere when deaf consumers want to access vrs.

    Reply
  • deafgun 12 years ago

    Regarding the person who threw food at the cashier. That is a very bad thing. Why? Two reasons. It gives the impression that deaf ppl know nothing except violence, And second, the person can be arrested for assault on other person.

    Barberclown, ur idea of using a prepared menus of fast foods is cool. Tell me more how to do that!!

    Reply
  • Michael 12 years ago

    everyone in the restaurant can read and write. But with fast food industry, it is harder to find someone to read your request.
    BTW, off-topic, what kind of camera do you use for for vblog? Signmail, webcam, or camcorder?

    Reply
  • Audrey 12 years ago

    Many times the workers who are not able to read, they ask their supervisors or another workers to help them to take my orders. No problem!!!

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  • DON STEWART 12 years ago

    YOU HAVE MANY GOOD POINTS HOW TO COMMUNICATE WITH THE FOOD CASHIER OR FOOD SERVER. TWO THINGS I WOULD DO ARE ASKING FOR THE MANAGER TO CLARIFY IT UP OR ASK HEARING PERSON BEHIND ME TO SPEAK. THAT IS THE WORLD WE LIVE IN AND KEEP GOING. DONT GIVE UP AND WE CAN ALWAYS EDCUATE THEM DAILY TO UNDERSTAND OUR CAPABILITIES AND LIMTS..

    SAME SITUATION WITH ME SINCE I AM THE ONLY DEAF ARCHITECT IN THE FIRM. WHEN I HAD AN INTERVIEW WITH MY BOSS, HE ASKED ME HOW DO I COMMUNICATE WITH CLIENTS OR CONSULTANTS. I TOLD HIM THAT I CAN USE EMAIL, FAX AND VIDEO RELAY SERVICE. I AM NOT GOING TO LET ANYTHING THAT BLOCKS ME. THE ONLY NEGATIVE THING IS THAT I WORK FOR A SMALL FIRM (6 PEOPLE). IT IS HARD FOR US TO MAKE PROFIT TO HIRE AN INTERPRETER FOR ME DURING TEAM MEETING OR GENERAL MEETING. WHAT I DO IS TO HAVE MY BOSS TO PREPARE POWER POINTS ON ISSUES AND PRESENT IT TO ME ON WALL WITH VIDEO PROJECTOR SO I CAN READ AND UNDERSTAND WHAT IS GOING ON. IF YOU HAVE ANY SUGGESTIONS THAT IS BETTER THAN MY METHOD. FEEL FREE TO EMAIL ME. THANKS AND HAVE A NICE DAY

    DON 🙂

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  • barberclown 12 years ago

    Deafgun- If you have blackberry device, look for the MemoPad icon, click that and make a new note and type whatever you want to remind yourself in the title, “Starbucks “, “burger king”, whatever you usualy go and write down whatever you want that under the prepared title!

    Hope this help ya!

    Reply
  • Tami 12 years ago

    Yeah it never solved the problem in diffrent restuarants. One big “hit” happened to me, that I never thought!

    At Dairy Queen in Missouri, I went “drive-thru” and gave the note to a lady by the window. Know what, she asked me to drive around again to speak at the speaker. I gave her a awful looks and still stayed till I got my orders – DONE! The lady was upset and went ahead. After that, I signed “Thank-you!” in nice manner!
    The lady nodded and smiled.

    I thought that was so big funny to me as my first time! SPEAK to SPEAKER! LOL!

    I am glad that you, Joey suggested a few options to do! I am curious about “drive-thru”???

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  • Rose 12 years ago

    Usually, when ordering food, I try to write VERY CLEARLY in manual, not cursive, handwriting. Yet some cashiers have trouble reading. I kept wondering WHY they were hired in the first place?? You still need to READ the computer to punch the buttons, etc!! Does not make sense to me.

    I wonder how the managers in fast food chains interview people for cashier position? Just hire ’em out of desperation? I’ve seen many cashiers with “I don’t care” attitudes. However, it DOES depend on the locations though. If it is in an affluent suburb, the cashiers tend to be more educated, likely those who work to earn money to attend college.

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  • Erick Ketcham 12 years ago

    Joey,

    Excellent vlog! It’s a good subject to bring up and discuss, for certain.

    I agree with “Working Brain.”

    Those “thumbs up” signs from hearing people is patronizing and paternalistic. We need to stop trying to get approval from hearing people.

    In situations like this, we have to be sensitive to the fact that some people actually can’t read and write. It’s a sad situation, but it happens.

    At the same time, if we meekily say “well, that guy’s the problem, I’m not the problem”, that’s like a disclaimer, a retreat, covering one’s back, etc… And of course, that would get a patronizing response. All they see is a Deaf-mute pointing the finger at the other guy.

    You’re right, Joey, there’s no answer to this situation…

    It has happened to me a few times, too. Fortunately for me, the cashier always had the sense to go to the manager or ask someone else what I wrote.

    But if a cashier ever froze and tried to read it themselves, I would personally get upset. I might even go far to write to the customer behind me “please tell this illiterate cashier to get the manager over here”

    And then I would inform the manager that the cashier has been holding up the line… And that I thought that he should apologize to the customers for the cashier holding up the line.

    Only the manager can make it right without getting that patronizing response. That is, if the manager is smart enough to say “I am sorry, our cashier cannot read”, out loud.

    Then I would cordially recommend that the cashier be rotated to burger flipping duty.

    Erick Ketcham

    Reply

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